What I’ve Watched

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The shows listed here are the ones I have finished in their entirety.

Meanwhile, the ratings are broken down into two scores: the first one is based on how much I personally enjoyed or liked the show and the second is based on how good I think the show is. Sure, maybe some shows can be crap, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t entertaining. The opposite sometimes also holds true. All scores are on a scale of 10.

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ANIME

91 Days (7·7)

91 Days (2016): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Acchi Kocchi (7∙7)

Acchi Kocchi (a.k.a. Place to Place, 2012): A cute enough slice-of-life show serviced by a cast of characters who may not have been given enough depth or development, but are passable enough in terms of chemistry. A tad too saccharine, but in the right dosage, it can be enjoyed as harmless fluff. (8/7)

Acchi Kocchi (10∙8)

Aku no Hana (a.k.a. The Flowers of Evil, 2013): There have been weird directorial choices every now and then but the anime is solid overall. It flows perfectly, although one would wish there were more episodes. It has a deftly-handled sense of chaos and breakdown that makes for a wild ride towards personal freedom that may or may not be questionable. (10/8)

Amaama to Inazuma (7·6)

Amaama to Inazuma (a.k.a. Sweetness and Lightning, 2016): (7/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Amagi Brilliant Park (7∙7)

Amagi Brilliant Park (2014): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Angel Beats! (8∙7)

Angel Beats! (2010): Its 13 episodes are obviously not enough to showcase its complex world, and large holes have to be plugged in with theories from the fandom. Still, this show works, what with its lighthearted approach to the topic of life and death. It does have vast array of half-baked characters only exploited for quick laughs or mechanical drama, though. (8/7)

Ano Hi Mita Hana no Namae wo Bokutachi wa Mada Shiranai (10∙8)

Ano Hi Mita Hana no Namae wo Bokutachi wa Mada Shiranai (a.k.a. Anohana: The Flower We Saw That Day, 2011): Full of raw emotion, layered characterization and rich development, it is an anime that emerges as something more than the sum of its parts. There’s some overblown drama and romance that stick out like a sore thumb, but these qualms get swept away by the story’s swift flow. (10/8)

Another (6∙4)

Another (2012): Decent story, mucky execution. One can only put in so much blood before the viewer gets desensitized, and one can only put in so much stupidity before the viewer shrieks out of sheer frustration. There are lots of plot twists straight out of a soap opera, but the show’s much more fun in retrospect. (6/4)

Ansatsu Kyoushitsu (8∙7)

Ansatsu Kyoushitsu (a.k.a. Assassination Classroom, 2015): (8/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Aoharu x Kikanjuu (7∙6)

Aoharu x Kikanjuu (a.k.a. Aoharu x Machinegun, 2015): (7/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Arakawa Under the Bridge (2010): Its quirky cast of characters makes for a palpable sense of community that complements its setting. Subtle plot movements also help in drawing the protagonist out of his shell. The director’s style is a good fit for this show, but it does wear on with time. (8/8)

Arakawa Under the Bridge x Bridge (7∙6)

Arakawa Under the Bridge x Bridge (2010): A second season that is sadly not as engaging as its predecessor. It loses any semblance of purpose and ends up as an episodic rehash of previous character dynamics that goes nowhere. There are occasional hints of major plot movements, but the show never follows up on those. There isn’t much to see here. (7/6)

Azumanga Daioh (10∙9)

Azumanga Daioh (2002): A funny and nostalgic look at simple aspects of high school life, brought to life by hysterical characters playing out in outrageous situations. Charming and entertaining even in its simplicity. It has spawned a lot of imitations, but nothing quite beats the original. (8/7)

Baccano! (10∙10)

Baccano! (2007): The show manages to both amaze with a storyline that is well thought-out, but not necessarily convoluted. Creative when it comes to structure, yet not confusing at all. It also captures palpably the sense of the wild days and has a colorful cast of characters who are not just quirky for the sake of it. (10/10)

Baka and Test (8∙6)

Baka to Test to Shoukanjuu (a.k.a. Baka and Test: Summon the Beasts, 2010): Playing by its own strengths, the outrageously effective comedy overshadows the sad excuse of a story, though the potential is there and not harnessed well. There’s not much when it comes to the characters, but the two male leads at least work to satisfying effect. (8/6)

Baka and Test 2 (7∙4)

Baka to Test to Shoukanjuu Ni! (a.k.a. Baka and Test: Summon the Beasts 2, 2011): Female characters get way too flattened (and the half-hearted attempts to shore them up can get pretty embarrassing), but the humor manages to carry the whole show, which, by this point, no longer has any plans to provide an actual story. (7/4)

Bakuman (2010-11): Nice depiction of the world of manga that brings it closer to the ordinary otaku, but ultimately, it is decidedly mediocre and needlessly sexist. This would have been a more enjoyable anime if the males were hooked less on sugar and if the females actually grew backbones. (5/5)

Bakuman 2 (5∙6)

Bakuman 2 (2011-12): Goes off with a very shaky start that perhaps represented the nadir for this franchise. Still, the show eventually finds its groove and ups the stakes, making the rather unlikable characters somewhat more sympathetic. The road to manga stardom is depicted in a surprisingly engaging way. (5/6)

Bakuman 3 (7∙7)

Bakuman 3 (2012-13): A lot more enjoyable than its previous seasons. The much faster pacing helps in preventing tedium, while some semblance of character growth can be gleaned, making for an experience that is less punctuated with annoyance. The side characters are still the ones to watch for, however. (7/7)

Barakamon (7∙8)

Barakamon (2014): (7/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Battery (5·5)

Battery (2016): (5/5)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Binan Koukou Chikyuu Bouei-bu (6∙5)

Binan Koukou Chikyuu Bouei-bu Love! (a.k.a. Cute High Earth Defense Club Love!, 2015): (6/5)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Binbougami ga! (7∙7)

Binbougami ga! (a.k.a. Good Luck Girl!, 2012): Smart cat-and-mouse hijinks packed with a lot of heart, though, sometime of the overly melodramatic variety. The main characters get points for being flawed in a non-aggravating way. Humor does get too raunchy for comfort, and becomes too repetitive, but it’s been a fun ride all in all. (7/6)

Boku Dake ga Inai Machi (7·7)

Boku Dake ga Inai Machi (a.k.a. Erased, 2016): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Boku no Hero Academia (9·8)

Boku no Hero Academia (a.k.a. My Hero Academia, 2016): (9/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Bungou Stray Dogs (7·6)

Bungou Stray Dogs (2016): (7/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Bungou Stray Dogs 2 (7·7)

Bungou Stray Dogs 2nd Season (2016): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

C (4∙4)

C: The Money of Soul and Possibility (2011): It had intriguing ideas but everything is scattered all over the place when it comes to execution. While it is nice to see what’s inside the psyche of the characters, the lack of any substantial growth, accompanied by a script that doesn’t do the show any favors, cancel out this accomplishment. (4/4)

Charlotte (7·5)

Charlotte (2015): Feels like Angel Beats!, but then, it is such a schizophrenic and plot hole-ridden, melodramatic mess! Even its genre is all over the place not to mention its dreadful attempts at comedy. Too bad, because the premise would have done better had it not ended up at the hands of anime’s most infamous schlockmeister. (6/4)

Cheer Danshi (5·6)

Cheer Danshi!! (a.k.a. Cheer Boys!!, 2016): (5/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! (7∙6)

Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! (a.k.a. Love, Chuunibyou and Other Delusions!, 2012): Starts off great when it did over-the-top comedy well but messes up in the home stretch when it tried for earnest angst that fell flat. Characters have good chemistry and well-drawn personalities, but they do lack variety. (7/6)

Concrete Revolutio (9·9)

Concrete Revolutio: Choujin Gensou (a.k.a. Concrete Revolutio: Superhuman Phantasmagoria, 2015): Highly stylized and presented with a wonky chronology, this show is fun to chew on when it comes to its robust themes of justice and the humanity of conflict, once the puzzle pieces are put together. Answering the question “which side are you on?” has never been this fun. (9/9)

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Coppelion (2013): This waste of a good premise is really flawed when it comes to plot and character logic. While there’s a nice atmosphere to this show, it is saddled by heavy-handed messages, overblown drama and laughable scenarios. Watchable, but it is a struggle to take this show seriously despite being okay on paper. (7/5)

Dagashi Kashi (6·5)

Dagashi Kashi (2016): (6/5)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Danshi Koukousei no Nichijou (9∙8)

Danshi Koukousei no Nichijou (a.k.a. Daily Lives of High School Boys, 2012): Its jokes tend to be hit or miss, but its heart and humor reels you in and leaves a sweet longing for high school life. Tune in for refreshingly original skits buttressed by witty banter and knowledgeable of the need for just the right timing. (9/8)

Death Parade (10∙9)

Death Parade (2015): (10/9)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Durarara!! (9∙7)

Durarara!! (2010): A sprawling urban epic embellished with a wonderful, eclectic cast that the show was not able to fully flesh out. Intriguing as the story built up, but then, the plot kind of loses its way during the show’s second half, leading to a rushed ending and a disappointing pay-off. In retrospect, this anime seemed to have aged badly. (9/7)

Eve no Jikan (8∙8)

Eve no Jikan (a.k.a. Time of Eve, 2009): Heartwarming anime that presents a perfect balance of funny and tearjerking moments, with a thought-provoking inquiry on what it means to be human. In such a short running time, the show artfully captures the conundrum of the role robots play in society. Effective and emotion-filled in its slice-of-life simplicity. (8/8)

Free! (6∙5)

Free! (2013): A good enough take on the issue of talent, buoyed on by a tongue-in-cheek approach to fanservice and scene-stealing characters who rise above a rather bland cast. Too bad, the season ending dove off a cliff and negated the messages that can be gleaned from this show. (6/5)

Gangsta (5·6)

Gangsta (2015): Anime blue balls! Why even adapt if there’s no intention to finish (this was the studio’s last production before folding up)? The fact the story’s setting is just that rich doesn’t serve as an excuse in fact, it took its sweet time getting to the point and focused too much on heavy-handed angst-fest and what appears to be unsubtle commentary on human prejudice and violence. (5/5)

Gin no Saji (6∙7)

Gin no Saji (a.k.a. Silver Spoon, 2013): A slice-of-life show with well-crafted themes on experiencing the beauty of life by braving its uncomfortable truths. Although not without its charms, the show does feel as if it’s talking down to the viewer at times. The interactions between the characters, however, can be repetitive and lacking in meat. (6/7)

Gin no Saji 2 (8∙7)

Gin no Saji 2 (a.ka. Silver Spoon 2, 2014): A bit wonky in execution when it comes to the agricultural setting, but the shift in focus on its human side compensates for this flaw. Despite having repetitive character interactions, its subtle character development is what makes this season worth watching (8/7)

Golden Time (5∙4)

Golden Time (2013-14): It occasionally hits the mark but it is ultimately saddled with an incredibly absurd story and unlikable characters that did not help matters. On one hand, it may be appreciated for trying to portray dysfunctional friendships and relationships, but it doesn’t seem as if the creators were aware of that. (5/4)

Honey and Clover (10∙10)

Hachimitsu to Clover (a.k.a. Honey and Clover, 2005): An awesome introspection on finding one’s self and going after love, through a masterfully rendered mix of hysterical comedy, heart-warming drama, and palpable romance. It makes for a painfully relatable but ultimately cathartic experience. Low-key but poignant. (10/10)

Hachimitsu to Clover II (9∙7)

Hachimitsu to Clover II (a.k.a. Honey and Clover II, 2006): A bit more dramatic compared with its predecessor, with the scenes sometimes carelessly intercut with the humor and the directing lacking restraint. It skimps on actual character development in favor of fleshing them out, although that is not necessarily a bad thing. (9/7)

Hanbun no Tsuki ga Noboru Sora (5∙5)

Hanbun no Tsuki ga Noboru Sora (a.k.a. Looking Up at the Half-Moon, 2006): Short and bittersweet romance drama set in a hospital, with a point that is rather simple, yet delivered in a patience-trying, hamfisted way. Full of rather unlikable and annoying characters, driving the plot solely through the actions that border on the unsympathetic. (5/5)

Hetalia Axis Powers (5∙6)

Hetalia Axis Powers (2009-10): This series of shorts occasionally shows flashes of brilliance, but is mostly forgettable and even a tad lacking in humor.There are some cute character interactions; however, the humor mostly relies on stale stereotypes and thinly-veiled historical references that show no insight. (5/6)

Higashi no Eden (10∙8)

Higashi no Eden (a.k.a. Eden of the East, 2009): Slow, draggy pacing in the middle detracts from what is otherwise a great, intellectually-stimulating anime that actually feels more like a movie. Its beautiful, sweeping political intrigue is complemented by the main leads’ good chemistry. (10/8)

Hitsugi no Chaika (7∙7)

Hitsugi no Chaika (a.k.a. Chaika the Coffin Princess): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Hyouka (8∙8)

Hyouka (2012): Enjoyable as a slice-of-life anime, its mystery aspect can sometimes be executed in an iffy way. Its best asset is its ability to flesh out every single personality in the show—side characters included. Show has solid, endearing leads and the male protagonist is easily among the most memorable in recent years. (7/8)

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha (6∙6)

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha (2014): A unique romantic slice-of-life anime that doesn’t have a one-track mind. This attempt to focus on different facets of relationship-building, however, ends up executed clumsily, culminating in a finale that fails to hold up. The lead characters are well-rounded enough, if a bit underdeveloped. (6/6)

Isshuukan Friends (8∙7)

Isshuukan Friends (a.k.a. One Week Friends, 2014): (8/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Jinrui wa Suitai Shimashita (8∙8)

Jinrui wa Suitai Shimashita (a.k.a. Humanity Has Declined, 2012): Endearing, if a bit too weird to handle at times. Divided into arcs, some are pretty strong while others can fall flat from time to time. The show is funny when it brings on the laughs and does good, witty satire. The protagonist and the fairies are charming characters. (8/8)

Kagewani (4·5)

Kagewani (2015): A protagonist who’s too passive and detached adds nothing to an anime where the thrill is too muted and the story too cliche. The story took forever to get to the point, and by the home stretch, the show could not expound anymore on why it had to be told to begin with. But, at least, the art looks good, even if obviously made on a shoestring budget. (4/5)

Kakumeiki Valvrave (4∙3)Kakumeiki Valvrave (a.k.a. Valvrave the Liberator, 2013): Is it a parody of the mecha genre, or is it just a bad show that happens to take tropes to an extreme in order to increase the shock value? Entertaining for the cheesy sappiness, but it’s ultimately just a ridiculous show whose creators did not think things through. (4/3)

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Kakumeiki Valvrave 2 (a.k.a. Valvrave the Liberator 2, 2013): Somewhat better when it relied less on the weird and more on trying to make sense, but it’s no less ridiculous for it. It’s only saved by the nice, colorful visuals, the trainwreck hilarity and the prevalent homoeroticism. (7/5)

Karneval (3∙3)

Karneval (2013): It’s all set-up and no pay-off. The story is just too ambitious for its own good. It tries too hard to be ambiguous but it’s hard to summon genuine curiosity for its supposed mysteries. The fact that it has a cast of paper-thin characters does not help matters at all. (3/3)

Kekkai Sensen (7∙6)

Kekkai Sensen (a.k.a. Blood Blockade Battlefront, 2015) : (7/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans (7∙6)

Kidou Senshi Gundam: Tekketsu no Orphans (a.k.a. Mobile Suit Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans, 2015-16): (7/6)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Koi to Senkyo to Chocolate (3∙4)

Koi to Senkyo to Chocolate (a.k.a. Love, Elections and Chocolate, 2012): Plotting is messy; focus is lacking. There are too many characters and plotlines and not one of them is something to care for. The politics is interesting, but it gets neglected for stupid, unfunny harem elements. (3/4)

Kokoro Connect (6∙5)

Kokoro Connect (2012): It had assured directing, but it was not necessarily outstanding. The personal dilemmas were intriguing at first but they did not lead to anything meaningful. It tries too hard to be deep, but its attack on its issues is actually rather superficial and even insulting. (6/5)

Kotoura-san (3∙4)

Kotoura-san (2013): This show is dragged down by aimless direction and scattered tone despite being somewhat deeper than it lets on. Even then, its clumsy, oftentimes insulting handling of its issues ends up as a deal-breaker. The male lead is a hoot (but only because of the actor), rising above a rather boring cast. (8/7)

Little Busters! (4∙4)

Little Busters! (2012-13): Plodding and extremely boring, the show is populated with too many characters, with not one possessing something resembling a personality; conflict is therefore sapped of impact. Underwhelming writing and directing, with the acting running the gamut from dull to irritating. (4/4)

Little Busters! Refrain (7∙7)

Little Busters! Refrain (2013): Already better than its predecessor once it started dropping the saccharine tone and hinting at the deeper conflicts that would beset this group of friends. There’s a remarkably vast improvement, compared to its dismal previous outing. (7/7)

Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica (5∙7)

Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica (a.k.a. Puella Magi Madoka Magica, 2011): The complex story is engaging, but the characters, not so, as they border on the mundane. The antagonist, while not someone to root for, is portrayed with shades of gray, which is a plus for the show. (5/7)

Mawaru Penguindrum (8∙8)

Mawaru Penguindrum (2011): (8/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Mayo Chiki! (3∙3)

Mayo Chiki! (2011): The lack of plot and character consistency aside—the main female characters have to be the most annoying ever, this for a harem anime. The only possible compliment for this show is that it’s not that horrible, if gauged by the standards of its genre. (3/3)

Nagi no Asukara (7∙7)

Nagi no Asukara (a.k.a. A Lull in the Sea, 2013-14): It’s familiar fare that runs on good character development, despite the ham-fisted execution. Too bad, the relationships got bogged down during its second half. Gorgeous visuals make up for a rather underutilized setting. (7/7)

Natsuyuki Rendezvous (3∙4)

Natsuyuki Rendezvous (2012): What started as a mature tale of love becomes an uncomfortable story of obsession as it quickly loses direction, leaning on a seriously unnecessary plotline and abusing flashbacks. Plot goes from too fast to too slow. It doesn’t help that characterization is inconsistent, with declarations from the characters that increasingly become hard to buy. (3/4)

NHK ni Youkoso! (10∙10)

N.H.K. ni Youkoso! (a.k.a. Welcome to the N.H.K.!, 2006): A marvelous critique of social ailments, aided by a fantastic cast that really feels human. This show goes against the grain of mainstream anime by going all out in its portrayal of ugliness and hope. It’s just perfect—it feels surreal yet very real. (10/10)

Nisekoi (4∙3)

Nisekoi (a.k.a. False Love, 2014): A somewhat passable (if cliched) comedy that leaves a bad taste for its depiction of women. The male protagonist brings sexist douchebaggery to dizzying heights. If it weren’t for such qualms, this show could have been a good example of how to revel in the comfort of the conventional. (4/3)

One Punch Man (7·7)

One Punch Man (2015): Mindless fun that is a bit overhyped in terms of acclaim. It’s a solid B-list comedy whose side characters are more interesting than the lead, whose passiveness was played up too much by both the writers and the actor. Excellent animation makes it at least a visual treat to behold. (7/7)

Ookami Shoujo to Kuro Ouji (6∙5)

Ookami Shoujo to Kuro Ouji (a.k.a. Wolf Girl and Black Prince, 2014): (6/5)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Ore Monogatari!! (5·5)

Ore Monogatari!! (a.k.a. My Love Story!!, 2015): What was initially a relaxing—if sedate—slice-of-life story devolved into the usual brainless shoujo drivel that only recycles script by the episode and draws up phony conflict that have no weight. The male lead is interesting on paper for bucking conventions, but he and his leading lady only hammed up the cloying sweetness. (4/5)

Osomatsu-san (8∙8)

Osomatsu-san (a.k.a. Mr. Osomatsu, 2015-16): (8/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Outbreak Company (6∙6)

Outbreak Company (2013): A tad too patronizing but interesting directorial choices and insightful social commentary should make this show a little more watchable than its premise suggests. Allusions to the notion of cultural imperialism is there, but not exhausted. Could have been a good satirical take on the otaku culture if only it went all out. (6/6)

Papa no Iukoto wo Kikinasai! (7∙6)

Papa no Iukoto wo Kikinasai! (a.k.a. Listen to Me, Girls!, 2012): Disappointing in that it knows what it wants to say, but it ends up being overwhelmed by the overly saccharine direction that it ultimately took. The characters have potential but they end up as one-dimensional caricatures, not to mention the pervasive sexualization. Still watchable for the story. (7/6)

Ping Pong (10∙10)

Ping Pong the Animation (2014): A somewhat simple story told skillfully through excellent, engaging visuals. Not one aspect of this show gets wasted, with attention given to every character, every plot point, and every single step of the feet and swing of the racket. Goes overboard with its quirky style at times, but all in all, this is a classic! (10/10)

Plastic Memories (3∙3)

Plastic Memories (2015): (3/3)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Prison School (10·9)

Prison School (2015): There’s pleasure to be derived from this solidly written, raunchy laugh-a-minute comedy that veers into dark humor at times but never lets go of its youthful earnestness. Even in such an absurd setting, the characters are to root for and everyone gets their just desserts without anyone being cast as too pitiful. (10/9)

Punch Line (8∙8)

Punch Line (2015) : (8/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Pupa (3∙4)

Pupa (2014): What could have been an effectively creepy anime ends up losing its bite because of the inconsistent and obtrusive censorship and the bastardized format. Going by the snippets of its barely decipherable plot, this anime could have been that rare, deep horror tragedy that does not solely rely on the gore. (3/4)

Rainbow - Nisha Rokubou no Shichinin (9∙7)

Rainbow: Nisha Rokubou no Shichinin (a.k.a. Rainbow: The Criminal Seven of Cell 2-6, 2010): Gritty as gritty can be, but eventually becomes heartwarming and bright. The drama veers into over-the-top territory; the dialogue can be seriously cheesy and the intrusive narration should not have been there. The show is full of heart though, and the characters and the narrative sweeps the viewer along. (9/7)

Ranpo Kitan (2·4)

Ranpo Kitan: Game of Laplace (a.k.a. Ranpo’s Mysteries: Game of Laplace, 2015): This is an anime that attempts to pass off its various stylistic hang-ups as intelligence, without realizing it comes off as ignorantly insufferable. Annoyingly detached and gimmicky characters, egregious tonal shifts and cluttered storytelling sprinkled with pure BS mar this show. (2/4)

Robotics;Notes (3∙3)

Robotics;Notes (2012-13): What a big mess! The elements are intriguing on their own but they fail to gel into a coherent whole. Not much makes sense and the execution of the premise just doesn’t work at all. The characters are nothing more than farcical, walking cliches, most of whom are barely useful to the plot. (3/3)

Rokka no Yuusha (5·6)

Rokka no Yuusha (a.k.a. Rokka: Braves of the Six Flowers, 2015): A rather flawed and lackluster procedural drama in fantasy-adventure clothing, albeit one more restrained and less urgently paced than this genre’s usual offerings. Too bad, its ending jettisoned all goodwill that could have been derived from its mystery. (4/5)

Ryuugajou Nanana no Maizoukin (2∙3)

Ryuugajou Nanana no Maizoukin (a.k.a. Nanana’s Buried Treasure, 2014): Huh? Wait! What?! What was the point of this show? Barely existent story-telling, sloppily handled tropes and plot points, aimless directing. Not to mention, every single character seems nothing more than mere walking archetypes, aimed only at pandering in the worst way possible. (2/2)

Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan (10·10)

Saiki Kusuo no Ψ-nan (a.k.a. The Disastrous Life of Saiki K., 2016): (10/10)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Sakamichi no Apollon (9∙8)

Sakamichi no Apollon (a.k.a. Kids on the Slope, 2012): Directed with deft hands, this anime flows well despite the fast pacing, although it mucks up a bit during the home stretch. The jazz, the atmosphere and the relationships are the most wonderful highlights of the sense of realism this show has. (8/7)

Sakigake!! Cromartie Koukou (9∙10)

Sakigake!! Cromartie Koukou (a.k.a. Cromartie High School, 2003-04): It’s dryly hilarious and witty on a surprising number of levels. It just gets progressively weirder and funnier over time, even without the characters outright going for the laughs. One of the smartest comedies out there, especially of the deadpan, surrealist variety. (7/8)

Sakurako-san no Ashimoto ni wa Shitai ga Umatteiru (5·5)

Sakurako-san no Ashimoto ni wa Shitai ga Umatteiru (a.k.a. Beautiful Bones: Sakurako’s Investigation, 2015): Annoying characters—including the titular character who is prone to talking down to the viewer—further tank a slice-of-life mystery series whose writing was already floundering to begin with. (5/5)

Samurai Flamenco (4∙5)

Samurai Flamenco (2013-14): Sure, it tried something new and its messages were loud and clear. Its sudden shift to superhero hijinks, as opposed to the realistic take it had earlier was purposeful too. But, the way it discarded its initial tone and even some of its characters for a barely set-up trajectory was jarring, and the anime as a whole just crashed and burned spectacularly. (4/5)

Sayonara Zetsubou-sensei (9∙9)

Sayonara, Zetsubou-sensei (a.k.a. Goodbye, Teacher Despair, 2007): This show has a wacky script packed with social commentary, made more enjoyable by the weirdly funny characters. The sheer amount of visual humor makes it a hard watch, but this is one of the few instances where its post-modern style meshed well with the substance. (9/9)

School Days (6∙6)

School Days (2007): The story was decent, if poorly-paced, but the visuals was below average (what with weird eyes and irritating facial expressions). While it can be taken as a study on how people can ruined when gonads rule the roost, the show would have been more enjoyable if there was even one character that was not pitiful, annoying, or downright infuriating. (6/6)

Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso (8∙7)

Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso (a.k.a. Your Lie in April): (8/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Shimoneta (10∙8)

Shimoneta to Iu Gainen ga Sonzai Shinai Taikutsu na Sekai (a.k.a. Shimoneta: A Boring World Where the Concept of Dirty Jokes Doesn’t Exist, 2015): Undeniably crass and purposefully offensive, this show is a powerful satire on the intertwined issues of sexual mores and freedom of expression that spare no side of the issue, albeit one as subtle and nuanced as being hit with a sledgehammer. (10/8)

Shingeki no Kyojin (5∙7)

Shingeki no Kyojin (a.k.a. Attack on Titan, 2013): A popular anime whose hype is understandable, given its breath-taking action, and themes of revolution and overcoming adversity (albeit heavy-handed in execution). Something could have been done about its slow plotting and one-note characters, however. (5/7)

Shirokuma Cafe (10∙8)

Shirokuma Café (a.k.a. Polar Bear’s Café, 2012-13): An animated sitcom that is oddly familiar, yet refreshing in unexpected ways. Its humor isn’t very high-concept, but it does grow on the viewer, as do the characters. Nothing out of the ordinary, but it is fine as it is. (10/8)

Sidonia no Kishi (8∙7)

Sidonia no Kishi (a.k.a. Knights of Sidonia, 2014): (8/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Sidonia no Kishi 2 (5∙4)

Sidonia no Kishi: Daikyuu Wakusei Seneki (a.k.a. Knights of Sidonia: Battle for Planet Nine, 2015): (5/4)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Space Dandy (9∙8)

Space Dandy (2014): The sheer creativity of the various directorial styles employed has to be appreciated, even if they don’t work all the time. It feels more like a Western cartoon than an anime, but it showcases the best of both worlds. Kind of over-hyped, but it is a worthwhile watch. (9/9)

Special A (7∙6)

Special A (2008): A run-of-the-mill shoujo romance that does not exactly age well. Still, despite reveling in the cliches, it is not a waste of time, with serviceable characters, familiar humor, and a passable story. Somewhat unfocused in its home stretch, however. (7/6)

Steins;Gate (10∙9)

Steins;Gate (2011): The story starts really slowly, but builds up to one of sci-fi anime’s most solid offerings. Although there are a few problematic points that went glossed over, this show is an epic mix of scientific thriller and human drama, complete with a marvelous cast. (10/9)

Subete ga F ni Naru (5·6)

Subete ga F ni Naru: The Perfect Insider (a.k.a. Everything Becomes F: The Perfect Insider, 2015): One word: pretentious. Granted, it is perhaps in the transition to the anime medium that this show failed, with the script even sounding like the actors are just reading the novel itself. The main characters are interesting and there’s chemistry, but there’s little else of note when it comes to the story. (5/6)

Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu (9∙8)

Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu (a.k.a. The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, 2006): It has a well-developed world that leaves much to the imagination and a good trove of characters that have a surprising degree of depth. The slice-of-life episodes do not fully utilize the intriguing set-up but the show is enjoyable all throughout. (9/8)

Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu 2009 (8∙6)

Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu (a.k.a. The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, 2009): There are brilliant concepts at work in these additional episodes, but the execution leaves much to be desired. It actually feels gimmicky compared to the older series, but at least, it supplements the previous episodes well. (8/6)

Sword Art Online (3∙3)

Sword Art Online (2012): Overrated, shallow and stupid. There’s a large trove of potential conflict waiting to be mined, but this is ignored in favor of repetitive, run-of-the-mill white-knight antics. The characters aren’t any better, what with a bland Marty Stu for a protagonist. Ill-executed at best and disgusting at worst. (3/3)

Sword Art Online II (3·3)

Sword Art Online II: Phantom Bullet (2014): (3/3) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Tamako Market (7∙7)

Tamako Market (2013): Adorable and delightful, if a bit vapid. Well-placed twists keep this show from joining the ranks of the forgettable moe anime that proliferate these days, although the setting bears more promise than the actual product. There’s a certain low-key charm to it that makes up for the formulaic nature of these shows. (7/7)

Tonari no Kaibutsu-kun (3∙5)

Tonari no Kaibutsu-kun (a.k.a. My Little Monster, 2012): An intriguing take on the conventional shoujo story. Sadly, the story went nowhere despite the fact that several plot points were introduced. The male characters actually got worse by the episode. (3/5)

Tonari no Seki-kun (8∙8)

Tonari no Seki-kun (a.k.a. The Master of Killing Time, 2014): Creative and snappy, this series of shorts does a good job of making the mundane awesome. It does lose steam during the middle episodes, but the chemistry between two leads only becomes more explosive with time. (8/8)

Tsuritama (7∙7)

Tsuritama (2012): It had wonderful visuals and quite engaging characters, but the plotting is shoddy. This is especially true for the last few episodes, where the heightened tension starts to ring false. Enjoyable enough for the simple, yet effective character development. (7/7)

Turning Girls (10∙9)

Turning Girls (2013): A cheap yet charming comedy presenting a dark and damning look at adult life. It’s funny and it has original gags, but it was very painful to watch, in a good way. Populated by a cast of rather immature adult women, it’s one of the rare comedic gems that actually makes a lingering impact. (10/9)

Uchouten Kazoku (9∙7)

Uchouten Kazoku (a.k.a. The Eccentric Family, 2013): Has the ability to evoke pathos towards its titular family but the rest of the cast is somewhat underutilized despite them being more than meets the eye. Still, its engaging lead characters are enough to compensate for a rather thin plot. (9/7)

Wakako-zake (7∙7)

Wakako-zake (2015): (7/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Working!! (9∙8)

Working!! (2010): Its wonderfully quirky cast makes the show work. It doesn’t hurt that the show also knows to make plot move despite the limitations of being a slice-of-life gag comedy. There’s not much to chew on, but it is good enough as a source of entertainment. (9/8)

Working'!! (7∙7)

Working’!! (2011): The wonderful characters and their interactions still make this show work, but the total lack of any plot and character development, along with its repetitive scenarios, disappoints. The skits do not stick as well as the ones in the previous season. (7/7)

Working!!! (9∙8)

Working!!! (2015): (9/8) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Yahari Ore no Seishun Rabukome wa Machigatteiru (7∙7)

Yahari Ore no Seishun Rabukome wa Machigatteiru (a.k.a. My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU, 2013): An awesome introspective mix of hysterical comedy, heart-warming drama, and palpable romance. It makes for a painfully relatable but ultimately cathartic experience. Low-key but poignant. (8/7)

yahari-ore-no-seishun-rabukome-wa-machigatteiru-zoku-7%c2%b78

Yahari Ore no Seishun Rabukome wa Machigatteiru (a.k.a. My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU, 2015): (7/8) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Yamato Nadeshiko Shichi Henge (9∙7)

Yamato Nadeshiko Shichi Henge (a.k.a. The Wallflower, 2006-07): A shoujo anime that transcends the pitfalls of its genre, what with its subversive refusal to make its female protagonist conform to the dictates of society. Meaningful and hysterical to boot. (9/7)

The Tatami Galaxy (10∙10)

Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei (a.k.a. The Tatami Galaxy, 2010): (10/10)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Yuri!!! on Ice (8·8)

Yuri!!! on Ice (2016): (8/8)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Zankyou no Terror (8∙7)

Zankyou no Terror (a.k.a. Terror in Resonance, 2014): (8/7)Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Zoku Sayonara Zetsubou-sensei (7∙7)

(Zoku) Sayonara, Zetsubou-sensei (a.k.a. Goodbye, Teacher Despair 2, 2010): The show doesn’t lose its awesomely weird humor, but it kind of gets repetitive by this point. It’s also a bit harder to watch even for those who already followed the first season. (8/7)

–oOo–

OTHER SHOWS

49 Days (10·9)

49 Days (South Korea, 2011): A ghost-possession story presenting a harrowing tale of living life to the fullest while embracing the inevitability of death. Despite dealing with such heavy topics, the tone is consistently quite uplifting and sentimental all throughout the show. Props for a solid thematic core and believable internal mythology. (10/9)

BrainDead (7·8)

BrainDead (United States, 2016): (?/?) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Cheer Up, Mr. Kim! (8·7)

Cheer Up, Mr. Kim! (South Korea, 2012-13): A soap opera featuring an unconventional household whose low-key antics and travails live up to its title tonally. Initially, it does not fall into the pitfalls of the genre, with characters actually feeling like real people living the real effects of their social standing. However, it gets overwhelmed later by some rather histrionic plot points—a shame for what could have been an example of how to best use the soap opera approach. (9/7)

Cheese in the Trap (8·7)

Cheese in the Trap (South Korea, 2016): (8/7) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Coffee Prince (9·8)

Coffee Prince (South Korea, 2007): Thoughtful romantic comedy whose gender-bending premise is not treated as a throwaway gimmick. Assured directing gives off a cheeky, poignant vibe; a quirky cast of characters carry the show. Derails quite a bit due to a last-minute extension brought on by the popularity of a harbinger of Hallyu peak. (9/8)

Daria (10·10)

Daria (United States, 1997-2001): (10/10) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Missing Nine (8·6)

Missing Nine (South Korea, 2017): (7/5) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Oh My Geum-bi (9·8)

My Fair Lady (a.k.a. Oh My Geum-bi, South Korea, 2016): (8/8) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Naku Boss Ko! (10·10)

Naku, Boss Ko! (Philippines, 2016): (7/6) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Nasaan Ka, Elisa (7·7)

Nasaan Ka, Elisa? (Philippines, 2o11): More watchable than your regular Filipino soap opera—what with its exploration of taboos—but that’s probably because this is a remake of a Chilean telenovela. It does not seem to have screwed up what the original has going for, but the momentum was, weirdly enough, killed during the last stretch when the revelations come together. (7/7)

Parks and Recreation (10·8)

Parks and Recreation (United States, 2009-15): (10/8) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

Prison School (10·8)

Prison School (Japan, 2015): An almost frame-by-frame adaptation of the anime, but compressed into nine 30-minute episodes and left scenes on the cutting room floor. But, it has a great cast—props to the actress playing the Vice-President—and all the advantages of playing out in the 3-D world. Comparatively, it has a better conclusion than the anime itself. (10/8)

That Winter, the Wind Blows (7·6)

That Winter, the Wind Blows (South Korea, 2013): An intriguing exploration of the heroine’s trust issues, but the schlocky cinematography caused a detached experience. With even the acclaimed writer faltering at the home stretch, the only take-away from this show is the lead actress’ acting breakthrough. (7/6)

Tomorrow With You (8·8)

Tomorrow With You (South Korea, 2017): (9/8) Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velidt esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur.

The Village (10·9)

The Village: Secrets of Achiara (South Korea, 2015): A solid crime thriller with twists tangled all throughout and allowed to unravel slowly. Buoyed by an ensemble of compelling characters who make up for a rather bland protagonist; although the antagonists steal the show, most are tinged with enough gray and all play a role in the central mystery. (10/8)

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